The lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis. The Lucy Poems Quotes and Analysis 2022-12-08

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The Lucy poems by William Wordsworth are a series of five poems that reflect on the theme of love and loss. The poems are named after a woman named Lucy, who is believed to be a real person that Wordsworth knew and was deeply in love with. However, Lucy is also a symbolic figure representing the idea of love and its fleeting nature.

The first poem in the series, "Strange fits of passion have I known," is a reflection on the intense and irrational nature of love. The speaker describes feeling a strong, almost obsessive, desire for Lucy and how this love consumes him. The poem also touches on the idea of love as a force beyond our control, as the speaker says "My breast is full, with something more than rage; / A something that doth permit me not / To cease from gazing upon the face / Of one dear object."

The second poem, "I travelled among unknown men," is a reflection on the speaker's travels and how they have been shaped by his love for Lucy. The speaker describes feeling a sense of loneliness and isolation as he travels, and how his thoughts always return to Lucy. The poem also touches on the theme of memory and how our past experiences shape who we are.

The third poem, "She dwelt among the untrodden ways," is a reflection on the beauty and innocence of Lucy. The speaker describes Lucy as being pure and untouched by the world, and how her presence brings joy and peace to those around her. However, the poem also hints at the fleeting nature of love, as the speaker says "Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang."

The fourth poem, "Three years she grew in sun and shower," is a reflection on the passage of time and how it can change our relationships and feelings. The speaker reflects on how Lucy has grown and changed over the years, and how his love for her has also evolved. The poem also touches on the idea of loss and how it can leave a lasting impact on our lives.

The final poem in the series, "A slumber did my spirit seal," is a reflection on the speaker's grief and sense of loss after Lucy's death. The speaker describes feeling a deep sense of sadness and emptiness, and how he is left with only memories of Lucy. The poem also touches on the theme of memory and how it can provide comfort in the face of loss.

Overall, the Lucy poems by William Wordsworth are a beautiful and poignant reflection on the theme of love and loss. Through the character of Lucy, Wordsworth explores the intense and irrational nature of love, the impact of memory and the passage of time, and the pain of loss. These poems are a testament to the enduring power of love and the lasting impact it can have on our lives.

She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways Poem Summary and Analysis

the lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis

O joy, that in our embers Is something that doth live, That nature yet remembers What was so fugitive! Mary Gamble has no issue. At this point, the parents weep and give up their search for Lucy. Always look for a simple explanation, and do not be afraid to express it. Upon returning to England, he realizes that, being the place where his beloved Lucy lived and died, England will always be his home and he will never leave again. The Knight, Sir Walter, died in course of time, And his bones lie in his paternal vale. Now, the readers can understand that Lucy is a sweet, darling child. Nature intends to be "Both law and impulse" unto Lucy.

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Lucy Gray by William Wordsworth

the lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis

Though I myself happen not to love this poem half so dearly as many other Wordsworthians, it is undeniably great in its ambition and scope, and to miss it from a list of greatest poems owing to personal caprice would be much to condemn the value of the list. But the mystery which makes them so powerful remains. Beside the springs of Dove, 2 And very few to love: 4 There is no alliteration because in this poem is not found repetitions of the same sound at frequent intervals and there is no onomatopoeia because it has no words which imitate sounds and thus suggest the object described. Thank you for all your motivations, advices, prays, loves and financial. Next comes the addition of 1804, making the poem 11 stanzas in length.


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The Lucy Poems “Strange fits of passion have I known” Summary and Analysis

the lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis

One questions if a loss of some kind is near or if the speaker will lose, figuratively speaking, the compass of his life which is Lucy. Mourning transforms the "happy dell" of 'Three Years She Grew in Sun and Shower' into a barren heath. In general, the poems end in a despairing tone because the lover as left alone with the knowledge that all that is left of his beloved is the grief he feels. If "humble and rustic life" allowed the play of elemental emotions, it is also a state in which "passions of men are incorporated with the beautiful and permanent forms of nature. This occurrence sets off panic and fear in the speaker's mind—his "strange fit of passion.

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The Lucy Poems Summary

the lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis

The mention of springs connotes purity, suggesting that she was a virtuous woman living in the countryside. The moon reference also creates a dream-like tone that later leads the reader to question if the speaker indeed had such an experience, or if he is describing a dream about his lover. To sum up, Lucy poems have a major theme in common, the untimely death of the lady and the lamentation of her lover. Thou wanderer through the woods, How often has my spirit turned to thee! She was a beautiful and solitary maiden who resided in the remote English countryside near the River Dove. Detailed meaning of this poem is the meaning of each stanza. There is no metaphor because it has no indirect comparison or implied.

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How does Nature educate Lucy in the poem The Education of Nature by William Wordsworth

the lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis

There are some lovely lines in these sections. It first appeared in the 1800 edition of Lyrical Ballads, which Wordsworth jointly published with Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Some are joyful, while others seem to come from nowhere and may be less than promising. Romantics believed that humans are in their most exalted state when they are closest to nature, which is why they frequently idealize childhood and rural life. The sounds of this poem are rhyme and assonance. This is full of curious moments—including one or two that might surprise a too-narrow understanding of Wordsworth—and soaring, beautiful language and description.


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The Eight Greatest Poems of William Wordsworth

the lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis

The sentiment is all-consuming. Repetition is a structure occurs repeat single lines or whole stanzas at intervals to emphasize a particular idea. The sad irony is that the same Nature eventually cuts her life short, because, as the speaker puts it, it wants to take her for itself. Her memory is connected with the memory of England, and his love for England and Lucy are one and the same. She dwelt among untrodden ways. So, you may wonder, what edition of Wordsworth to read? The third stanza continues to build the setting and atmosphere of the poem. The feeling of frantically searching, the weeping and accepting her death, and the renewed hope at seeing her footsteps are all feelings the readers can either relate to or at least imagine.

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The Lucy Poems by William Wordsworth

the lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis

Around 1798—9, Coleridge began bothering Wordsworth about writing a long philosophical poem. However, the sight of her footprint gives hope. Wordsworth read copious amounts of eighteenth-century poetry, and there is much of the style of the time—albeit deeply transformed—in his writing, too. The second phase is marked with the poem: Three years she grew in sun and shower 3. . For I have learned To look on nature, not as in the hour Of thoughtless youth, but hearing oftentimes The still, sad music of humanity, Not harsh nor grating, though of ample power To chasten and subdue. Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semiautobiographical poem of his early years which he revised and expanded a number of times.

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The Lucy Poems Analysis

the lucy poems by william wordsworth analysis

The second date is today's date — the date you are citing the material. Although practicality kept him from this early lover and daughter, he helped to support them financially for the rest of their lives. In an April 1799 letter, Coleridge wrote of 'A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal', "Some months ago Wordsworth transmitted to me a most sublime Epitaph. Poetry is the term for the many literary forms through which man has given rhythmic expression to his most imaginative and intense perceptions of himself and universe. Whither is fled the visionary gleam? Diploma Social Communications Media, Maharashtra Board of Technical Education. One impulse from a vernal wood May teach you more of man; Of moral evil and of good, Than all the sages can. That does not mean that he is unaffected by her death.

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