The destructors setting. What is the setting of the story The Destructors? 2022-12-27

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Atticus Finch, the protagonist of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," is a single father raising two young children, Jem and Scout, in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama. Atticus is a lawyer and a deeply moral man who is highly respected in his community. He is also an exceptional parent, with a distinct parenting style that is centered on empathy, understanding, and respect.

One of the most notable aspects of Atticus's parenting style is his emphasis on empathy. He consistently encourages his children to try to see things from others' perspectives and to understand their feelings. For example, when Scout is frustrated with her teacher and classmate, Miss Caroline, Atticus advises her to try to understand why Miss Caroline is behaving the way she is. He also encourages Jem and Scout to visit with their reclusive neighbor, Boo Radley, and to try to understand why he might be afraid to leave his house.

In addition to emphasizing empathy, Atticus also focuses on understanding and education. He encourages his children to think critically and to question the world around them. He frequently engages them in discussions about the news, history, and current events, and encourages them to form their own opinions. Atticus is also a strong believer in the value of education, and he encourages his children to do their best in school and to learn as much as they can.

Another important aspect of Atticus's parenting style is his emphasis on respect. He teaches his children to respect others, regardless of their race, social status, or background. He also models this behavior himself, treating everyone he encounters with kindness and respect. Atticus is especially concerned with teaching his children to respect the law and the justice system, and he works to instill these values in them through his own actions and words.

Overall, Atticus's parenting style is centered on empathy, understanding, and respect. He encourages his children to think critically and to try to understand others' perspectives, and he models these values himself through his own behavior. His approach to parenting has a profound impact on his children, helping them to become kind, compassionate, and fair-minded individuals.

The setting of "The Destructors" by Graham Greene is a post-World War II neighborhood in London, England. The neighborhood is described as being in ruins and full of rubble, a reflection of the destruction caused by the war.

The story takes place in the summer of 1954, nearly a decade after the war ended. The neighborhood is still struggling to recover from the bombings and destruction caused by the war. The houses are dilapidated and run-down, and there is a sense of despair and hopelessness among the residents.

The main characters of the story, a group of teenage boys known as the Wormsley Common Gang, are drawn to the destruction and chaos in their neighborhood. They take pleasure in tearing down and destroying what is left of their community, symbolizing the ongoing turmoil and uncertainty of the time.

The gang's leader, T. (short for Trevor), is particularly drawn to the idea of destroying an untouched house that stands out among the ruins. The house, which belonged to Mr. Thomas, a retired civil servant, represents stability and security in a world that has been turned upside down. T. and the gang see the house as a symbol of the old world, and they want to destroy it as a way of asserting their own power and agency in a world that has been so cruel to them.

The setting of "The Destructors" is a crucial element of the story, as it reflects the devastation and hopelessness of post-war England and the psychological impact it had on the young people who lived through it. It also serves as a backdrop for the destructive actions of the gang, who are trying to make sense of their place in a world that has been irrevocably changed by the war.

"The Destructors" is a short story by Graham Greene that was published in 1954. The story is set in the aftermath of World War II in a working-class neighborhood in London, England. The neighborhood has been heavily bombed during the war, and many of the houses have been destroyed or damaged. The main character of the story is a boy named Trevor, who is part of a gang of boys who call themselves "the Wormsley Common Gang."

The setting of the story is significant because it helps to establish the theme of destruction and rebuilding. The neighborhood where the story takes place has been devastated by the war, and the boys of the Wormsley Common Gang are trying to find ways to cope with the destruction and rebuild their community. The boys are drawn to the only remaining house on their block, a beautiful old house that has survived the bombing. The house is a symbol of the past, a reminder of what used to be and what could be again.

The boys decide to destroy the house as a way of coping with the destruction around them. They see the house as a symbol of the past and a reminder of the loss and suffering they have experienced. By destroying the house, they hope to erase the past and start anew. However, their actions ultimately lead to more destruction and chaos, as they are unable to control the forces they have unleashed.

The setting of "The Destructors" is an important element of the story because it helps to establish the theme of destruction and rebuilding. The bombed-out neighborhood and the beautiful old house serve as a backdrop for the boys' destructive actions and their attempts to rebuild their community. The setting helps to convey the sense of loss and despair that the boys feel in the aftermath of the war, as well as the hope and determination they have to rebuild their world.

What is the setting in The Destructors?

the destructors setting

The author presents the characters directly by telling the reader details about the characters and presents the characters indirectly by showing the reader. Greene writes that one of the gang members in the story, Blackie, probably slept underground in the Wormsley Common Underground Station when he was one year old. In that regard, it is not a reference to the setting as a measurement for the quality of the essay. The setting is significant because it is right before a holiday and the owner of the house will not be home, so the boys plan to destroy it. Consider the description that we are given of where the gang meets and how the setting contributes towards the mood of pessimism and emptiness that dominates the tale: The gang met every morning in an impromptu car-park, the site of the last bomb of the first blitz…. A parking lot in a town surrounded by bomb-destroyed neighborhood is where the boys meet. .

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The Importance Of Setting In The Destructors

the destructors setting

The short story takes place is London, England right after World War Two. Greene points out that, in the bombing, the pipes of Old Misery's house were damaged, and so he uses an outhouse instead of an indoor toilet. Grief shows no distinction in times of blood shed, all share in the shame of public and domestic dysfunction. Accordingly, the time period does not play a role in the story, with the theme being explored and understood in the modern time as well. Blackie and the other members of the gang all distrust Old Misery's exhibitions of generosity and so go along with Trevor's plan to destroy his house.

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The Destructors by Graham Greene

the destructors setting

So we can see that the historical setting, the surrounding cityscape, and the house and grounds of Old Misery all contribute to the theme of "The Destructors. This device is effective because each type of presentation provides the reader with a different perspective into each character. Mike, who is nine and constantly struggles to conceal how many things he finds surprising, is the only one who finds this change surprising. There are still many ruined or partially-ruined buildings, including the building belonging to Old Misery that the gang destroys. He met his future wife Vivian when she wrote him a letter to correct a mistake he had made in describing Catholicism; he converted to Catholicism in 1926 and married Vivien the next year. What kinds of details help to pinpoint the setting as that of postwar London? Old Misery was the antagonist because it antagonized the gang of boys to destroy the beautiful house so that it would be no better, or worse than the rest of the town.

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What is the setting of "The Destructors"?

the destructors setting

Graham Greene was a prolific letter writer, and maintained close friendships with some of the most influential writers of his time. This experience took a particularly harsh toll on the urban working class, who could not evacuate to large houses in the countryside like the rich and initially had few options for places to shelter. That the war has affected the way they react to each other. Destruction and Creation Set in post-WWII England, the short story itself suggests the possibility of creation in the face of destruction, specifically the widespread German bombings of London. This sets a gloomy atmosphere for talking about the aftereffects of war.

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The Destructors Part 1 Summary & Analysis

the destructors setting

The Destructors is to show how clear the characters and their actions are projected and guided by the subtle message of irony. The young may continue to set fires from hatred or from despair or ever escaping their crumbling prison. Many buildings were destroyed. Like the other boys who join together in mischievous conduct for thrills and a sense of camaraderie and belonging, Blackie is one of the group, and is a friend of the other boys. The war has normalized destruction for the boys, and so when Trevor proposes tearing down the house occupied by Old Misery, they have no qualms about what it will do to their neighborhood.

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Of what significance is the setting in "The Destructors"?

the destructors setting

. Thomas comes from the pre-war world of rigid class distinctions. This is one of the reasons his name gets shortened to T. Their reactions all fall on different points of that spectrum, but they all have one thing in common. Trevor, known as T. On the edge of the lot, one house that survived the war still stands, although it was damaged and is propped up by wooden struts. Greene suffered from depression his entire life.

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The Destructors Study Guide

the destructors setting

He never wasted a word even to tell his name until that was required of him by the rules. He studied at Oxford and then worked as a journalist, at the same time trying his hand at writing fiction. Greene travelled the world, occasionally working as a spy for the British secret service, writing as a freelance journalist and essayist, while also collecting material for the many thrillers that he wrote in addition to more traditional novels. What is the point of The Destructors? This is partially because they are adolescents acting out against the world as they find it. It can be assumed that the behavior of adults in such setting would not be questioned.

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Describe the setting of "The Destructors" and its significance. What kinds of details help to pinpoint the setting as that of postwar London?

the destructors setting

At the beginning of " The area in which Old Misery and the boys live must have been a nice neighborhood at one time, given that the house in which Old Misery lives was designed by the famed British architect Sir Christopher Wren. In this context, Blackie dislikes the idea that T. The story begins on the eve of a three-day weekend, when the newest member of a group of tough young boys who call themselves the Wormsley Common Gang becomes its leader. The interior of Old Misery's house and the grounds around it serve as the focused setting of the story. Who is old Misery in the destructors by Graham Greene? What does Trevor symbolize in the destructors? They are all well-aware of the consequences of stealing, and look down upon it as a dishonorable act that subscribes too heavily to belief in the value of things.


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The Destructors

the destructors setting

The old and sick because the prey of robbery or random violence, their final years drawn into a whirlpool of fear. Direct presentation allows for more of a complete understanding of the characters while indirect presentation forces the reader to make inferences based on dialogue and occurrences throughout the story. The local lorry driver finds the ruination of the old house hilarious. Why is the post-World War 2 setting of London so important to the story? The class divide is perhaps best illustrated when Trevor uses the word beautiful to describe Mr. The children were devastated and wanted to find a new way to get support so they made their own little The Destructors The Destructors, authored by Graham Greene, conveys the idea that people have the instinctive ability to destroy, and make a guilt choice, between what they believe in what is right from wrong.

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