Strange meeting poem. Strange Meeting Poem Summary and Analysis 2022-12-12

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Strange Meeting by Wilfred Owen

strange meeting poem

Foreheads of men have bled where no wounds were. I parried; but my hands were loath and cold. Heroic couplets are not appropriate for an unheroic war. They will not break their ranks even though "nations trek from progress". One of them is an English soldier the poet himself and the other, a German, although the poet nowhere mentioned their identities. Or, discontent, boil bloody, and be spilled.

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Strange Meeting (poem)

strange meeting poem

The poem is a wakeup call to the modern man who continues to propagate war instead of peace; the poem shakes the emotions of the reader to the core, and makes him re-think his perceptions of war. I mean the truth untold, The pity of war, the pity war distilled. The graphic use of imagery and language is both fantastic and real, emphasising the fact that this genre of poetry juxtaposes the natural and supernatural qualities of Romantic poetry. ALL of them suffered, and owen was particularly good at making this point heard. Here Owen's idea of beauty is somewhat akin to that of Keats' : "Beauty is truth, truth beauty". He says that the blind pursuit of war expedites only the retrogressive march of the nation to savagery and the consequent destruction.

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Strange Meeting Poem Summary and Analysis

strange meeting poem

He smiles and by that smile the poet comes to know that he is in hell. There is, of course, one piercing similarity in the two worlds: death. The poem relates, at the very beginning, how the meeting occurs and wherein. This meeting is strange because in reality such a meeting between a living and a dead is not possible. GradeSaver, 26 June 2014 Web. The meeting, of course, is not at all normal one between two acquaintances. Yet also there encumbered sleepers groaned, Too fast in thought or death to be bestirred.


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Strange Meeting Poem Analysis Summary Questions Answers

strange meeting poem

Finally, one must note the use of half-rhyme and broken meter present throughout the poem. When and how would the dead German soldier inform the people the truth underlying war? For by my glee might many men have laughed, And of my weeping something had been left, Which must die now. Explain the line - "And if it grieves, grieves richlier than here". Another critic reads the poem as a dream vision, with the soldier descending into his mind and encountering his poetic self, the poem becoming a mythological and psychological journey. Let us sleep now. His language is pitched high — sometimes too high. But being killed in the battlefield by the poet the dead German soldier is completely bereft of the power to feel any earthly loss or earthly desire.

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Full text of the poem Strange Meeting by Wilfred Owen. — The War Poets Gallery

strange meeting poem

I mean the truth untold, The pity of war, the pity war distilled. The poem is about the soldiers, their trade, and their suffering therein. Whatever hope is yours, Was my life also; I went hunting wild After the wildest beauty in the world, Which lies not calm in eyes, or braided hair, But mocks the steady running of the hour, And if it grieves, grieves richlier than here. The Use of Metaphors The poet describes beauty as mocking the running of an hour. Thus the meeting takes place in a strange spot-in hell.

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Wilfred Owen: Poems “Strange Meeting” Summary and Analysis

strange meeting poem

There is the world above—the chaotic, noisy expansiveness of the battlefield—and the world below—a quiet sanctuary—, where the soldiers find themselves. Then, when much blood had clogged their chariot-wheels I would go up and wash them from sweet wells, Even with truths that lie too deep for taint. Most important of all, the stranger invokes the common bond he and the speaker share. Of course, in this dialogue, the prominence of the German soldier is quite patent. None will break ranks, though nations trek from progress. Most of the words are monosyllabic and, out of context, are rather straightforward. The poem begins with the protagonist, a soldier, moving into a tunnel to escape battle.

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A Short Analysis of Wilfred Owen’s ‘Strange Meeting’

strange meeting poem

The poet Ted Hughes noted in his writings on "Strange Meeting": "few poets can ever have written with such urgent, defined, practical purpose. Foreheads of men have bled where no wounds were. Poor persona- he escapes death at battle, but descends to hell. Nevertheless, this dialogue well serves to give out what Owen seeks to contend here on the bitter business of war. It is possible that Owen, in his formative years, would recite the creed.

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Poem of the week: Strange Meeting by Wilfred Owen

strange meeting poem

The poet imagines that he has strayed from the battle-field into a dark tunnel where a dead soldiers are huddled together. They will be swift with swiftness of the tigress. None will break ranks, though nations trek from progress. He is merely a man who did what he thought he must. The plainness of the lines also serves to deafen and shorten the prose, a reflection of how the strange soldier must sound as he succumbs to death. Margaret Ferguson, et al. Even in the darkness of the underground vault he could recognize him as his killer.

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Literary Analysis of the Poem Strange Meeting: [Essay Example], 1782 words GradesFixer

strange meeting poem

It is about the impact that war has on the solders and other affected parties. They will be fierce and cruel like the tiger and will keep together even when nations move away from the path of progress. He foresaw the whole world marching in broken ranks away from progress. Foreheads of men have bled where no wounds were. The chariot wheel concept is borrowed from ancient wars. I knew you in this dark: for so you frowned Yesterday through me as you jabbed and killed. Then, as I probed them, one sprang up, and stared With piteous recognition in fixed eyes, Lifting distressful hands, as if to bless.

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