Sonnet 130 metaphor. What is the metaphor in Sonnet 130? 2023-01-01

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Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 metaphor

Tone The tone of Sonnet 130 is definitely sarcastic. But what Shakespeare is doing here is to turn the conventions of love poetry on their head. . Thus, this anti-Petrarchan comparison offers a touch of humor to Shakespeare's sonnet sequence as the mistress is far from being a goddess or ideal. While in the traditional Petrarchan or Italian sonnet, metaphors are used to amplify the beauties of the beloved, Sonnet 130 is an "anti-Petrarchan" sonnet, and the metaphors often act to As discussed above, another device used is parody, in which the poet satirizes existing conventions in order to make his point. Some internal rhymes were also used in the poem. It becomes apparent that the narrator's object of affection is a rarity and that the true nature and depth of her beauty can never be equaled by any pretentious comparison.

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Is there a metaphor in sonnet 130?

sonnet 130 metaphor

Before delving into the thematic and literary elements of a Shakespeare Sonnet 130 analysis, it is important to look at the actual structure of the text. The number was based on the order in which the poems were first published in 1609. And it's certainly ridiculous to make a comparison between the human voice and music. A woman of ideal beauty is thought to have snow-white breasts. Sonnet 130 is particularly notable among Shakespeare's sonnets because of its reversal of the common expectations that readers had about love poetry.

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How does the metaphor of music impact the meaning of Sonnet 130?

sonnet 130 metaphor

In his epitaph, which he oddly wrote himself, Shakespeare was pleading with the people not to disturb his final resting place. What more could one ask? Using comparisons to describe his mistress is what is being done throughout this sonnet and this use of metaphor is another example of it. This trend is extended throughout the three quatrains. This is almost a norm for sonnets though. Now this is called Shakespearean sonnet. When the speaker goes to measure the beauty of his beloved in the standard sense, he seemingly finds her to be hopelessly deficient in it. But Shakespeare broke this convention.

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Sonnet 130 and Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare Analysis Essay Example

sonnet 130 metaphor

Instead, he realizes that he has found a rare love, and that is far more valuable than believing in a love which relies on false comparisons in order to be beautiful. What is the main idea of the first quatrain of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare? This is an example of simile. He utilizes a For the first twelve lines of this sonnet, readers are likely stumped. Advertisements The lover continues similar comparisons making his lady look an ordinary human being. The speaker seems to be getting a bit nicer to say that he loves to hear her speak. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground. He is being frank here to admit that his mistress walks on the ground just like a normal human being, and not like a goddess, an angel or a fairy.


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What is the metaphor in Sonnet 130?

sonnet 130 metaphor

In "Sonnet 130", Shakespeare uses the following devices: Assonance- repetition of vowel sound in a line here, the sound "I" If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; Alliteration- repetition of a consonant sound in a line of poetry here, the sound "h" I love to hear her speak. These last two lines are the payoff for the whole poem. In the Sonnet 18, Shakespeare uses alliteration, which is words repeating one or more letters at the beginning of a word in the same line. It implies that the woman is very beautiful indeed, but suggests that it is important for this poet to view the woman he loves realistically. The speaker, for example, mentions: My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red; At first reading, it appears as if the speaker is insulting his lover. It was lovely to look at, and it gave off a strong fragrance. In line 13, Shakespeare states that he thinks his love is rare.

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Metaphor

sonnet 130 metaphor

Those ideals do not really matter, and they do not make the speaker love his mistress any less. Metaphor A metaphor is an indirect or implied comparison where there is a point of similarity. The poem opens with a simile, but the speaker describes that his mistress's eyes are not like the sun. One of these was particularly prevalent in Shakespeare's work, to the point where it is now known as a Shakespearean sonnet. The overall tone is satirical here to take on the poetic conventions regarding the same.

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Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

sonnet 130 metaphor

The poem satirizes the hyperbolic praise common in love poems of Shakespeare's era, and subverts the expectations of the reader that the beautiful images introduced will be compared favorably to his mistress. Different kinds of imageries including visual and olfactory imagery are used to highlight how a perfectly beautiful woman was perceived to be in the society of his time. Sonnet 130 Meaning Sonnet 130's meaning seems at first to be distinct from the meaning of most love poems. Why did Shakespeare not want his body exhumed? One is an opening octet with eight lines, and the other one is a closing sestet with six lines. Some are more melancholy than others, but no sonnet seems insulting - except this one! The next common device used in the poem is metaphor.

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Sonnet 130 (My mistress' eyes) Summary & Analysis

sonnet 130 metaphor

Instead of describing his mistress in these terms, the speaker instead says that she has no such traits. By using consonance instead of alliteration it makes it sound more mature and less like a nursery rhyme, suggesting there may be a deeper meaning to be found behind the comparisons he is making. She betrays the poet and rejects his love. But Shakespeare shatters that stereotype here. She is simply not the perfect, unattainable image we see in other sonnets. The language used is simple and eloquent.

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Literary Devices

sonnet 130 metaphor

Lesson Summary It is refreshing to read Sonnet 130 because it avoids the unrealistic, syrupy sentiments that may be found in many other sonnets. What did Shakespeare say about the curse on his grave? White generally symbolizes purity and innocence. In most cases the first line of the sonnet is used as a title in many anthologies. Thus, whiteness here symbolizes the conventions and the stereotypes. The full text of the poem is as follows: My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. Most of the lines in Sonnet 130 are end-stopped lines.

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